Bretonwood Agreement

730 delegates from the 44 Allied nations gathered at the Mount Washington Hotel in Bretton Woods, New Hampshire, USA, for the United Nations Monetary and Financial Conference, also known as the Bretton Woods Conference. Delegates deliberated from July 1 to 22, 1944 and signed the Bretton Woods Agreement on the last day. Through the establishment of a system of rules, institutions and procedures for regulating the international monetary system, these agreements created the IMF and the International Bank for Reconstruction and Development (IBRD), now part of the World Bank Group. The United States, which controlled two-thirds of the world`s gold, insisted that the Bretton Woods system was based on both gold and the U.S. dollar. Soviet representatives attended the conference, but then refused to ratify the final agreements and claimed that the institutions they had created were « branches of Wall Street. » [1] These organizations were commissioned in 1945 after the agreement was ratified by a sufficient number of countries. A devastated Britain had little choice. Two world wars had destroyed the country`s main industries, which paid for the import of half of the food and almost all of its raw materials except coal. The British had no choice but to ask for help. It was only when the United States signed a 4.4 billion pound British aid agreement on 6 December 1945 that the British Parliament ratified the Bretton Woods Agreements (which took place later in December 1945). [24] The agreement did not promote the discipline of the Federal Reserve or the U.S. government. The U.S.

Federal Reserve expressed concern about a rise in the domestic unemployment rate due to the depreciation of the dollar. To undermine the efforts of the Smithsonian Agreement, the Federal Reserve lowered interest rates in order to pursue a pre-domestic policy objective of full national employment. With the Smithsonian agreement, member states expected the dollar to return to the United States, but lower interest rates within the United States have led the U.S. dollar to continue to flow to foreign central banks. The influx of dollars into foreign banks continued the process of monetizing the dollar abroad, beating the objectives of the Smithsonian agreement.